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Documents  Bonatti, Christian | enregistrements trouvés : 34

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We will discuss an approach to the statistical properties of two-dimensional dispersive billiards (mostly discrete-time) using transfer operators acting on anisotropic Banach spaces of distributions. The focus of this part will be our recent work with Mark Demers on the measure of maximal entropy but we will also survey previous results by Demers, Zhang, Liverani, etc on the SRB measure.

37D50 ; 37C30 ; 37B40

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We will discuss an approach to the statistical properties of two-dimensional dispersive billiards (mostly discrete-time) using transfer operators acting on anisotropic Banach spaces of distributions. The focus of this part will be our recent work with Mark Demers on the measure of maximal entropy but we will also survey previous results by Demers, Zhang, Liverani, etc on the SRB measure.

37D50 ; 37C30 ; 37B40

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We will discuss an approach to the statistical properties of two-dimensional dispersive billiards (mostly discrete-time) using transfer operators acting on anisotropic Banach spaces of distributions. The focus of this part will be our recent work with Mark Demers on the measure of maximal entropy but we will also survey previous results by Demers, Zhang, Liverani, etc on the SRB measure.

37D50 ; 37C30 ; 37B40

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We present a functional-analytic approach to the study of transfer operators for Anosov flows. To study transfer operators, a basic idea in semi-classical analysis suggests to look at the action of the flow on the cotangent bundle. Though this idea is simple and intuitive (as we will explain in the lectures), we need some framework to make it work. In the lectures, we present such a framework based on a wave-packet transform.

37D20 ; 37C30

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We present a functional-analytic approach to the study of transfer operators for Anosov flows. To study transfer operators, a basic idea in semi-classical analysis suggests to look at the action of the flow on the cotangent bundle. Though this idea is simple and intuitive (as we will explain in the lectures), we need some framework to make it work. In the lectures, we present such a framework based on a wave-packet transform.

37D20 ; 37C30

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We present a functional-analytic approach to the study of transfer operators for Anosov flows. To study transfer operators, a basic idea in semi-classical analysis suggests to look at the action of the flow on the cotangent bundle. Though this idea is simple and intuitive (as we will explain in the lectures), we need some framework to make it work. In the lectures, we present such a framework based on a wave-packet transform.

37D20 ; 37C30

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Smooth parametrizations of semi-algebraic sets were introduced by Yomdin in order to bound the local volume growth in his proof of Shub’s entropy conjecture for C∞ maps. In this minicourse we will present some refinement of Yomdin’s theory which allows us to also control the distortion. We will give two new applications: - for any C∞ surface diffeomorphism f with positive entropy the saddle periodic points with Lyapunov exponents $\delta$-away from zero for $\delta \in]0,htop(f)[$ are equidistributed along measures of maximal entropy. - for C∞ maps the entropy is physically greater than or equal to the top Lyapunov exponents of the exterior powers. Smooth parametrizations of semi-algebraic sets were introduced by Yomdin in order to bound the local volume growth in his proof of Shub’s entropy conjecture for C∞ maps. In this minicourse we will present some refinement of Yomdin’s theory which allows us to also control the distortion. We will give two new applications: - for any C∞ surface diffeomorphism f with positive entropy the saddle periodic points with Lyapunov exponents $\delta$-away ...

37C05 ; 37C40 ; 37D25

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Smooth parametrizations of semi-algebraic sets were introduced by Yomdin in order to bound the local volume growth in his proof of Shub’s entropy conjecture for C∞ maps. In this minicourse we will present some refinement of Yomdin’s theory which allows us to also control the distortion. We will give two new applications: - for any C∞ surface diffeomorphism f with positive entropy the saddle periodic points with Lyapunov exponents $\delta$-away from zero for $\delta \in]0,htop(f)[$ are equidistributed along measures of maximal entropy. - for C∞ maps the entropy is physically greater than or equal to the top Lyapunov exponents of the exterior powers. Smooth parametrizations of semi-algebraic sets were introduced by Yomdin in order to bound the local volume growth in his proof of Shub’s entropy conjecture for C∞ maps. In this minicourse we will present some refinement of Yomdin’s theory which allows us to also control the distortion. We will give two new applications: - for any C∞ surface diffeomorphism f with positive entropy the saddle periodic points with Lyapunov exponents $\delta$-away ...

37C05 ; 37C40 ; 37D25

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Smooth parametrizations of semi-algebraic sets were introduced by Yomdin in order to bound the local volume growth in his proof of Shub’s entropy conjecture for C∞ maps. In this minicourse we will present some refinement of Yomdin’s theory which allows us to also control the distortion. We will give two new applications: - for any C∞ surface diffeomorphism f with positive entropy the saddle periodic points with Lyapunov exponents $\delta$-away from zero for $\delta \in]0,htop(f)[$ are equidistributed along measures of maximal entropy. - for C∞ maps the entropy is physically greater than or equal to the top Lyapunov exponents of the exterior powers. Smooth parametrizations of semi-algebraic sets were introduced by Yomdin in order to bound the local volume growth in his proof of Shub’s entropy conjecture for C∞ maps. In this minicourse we will present some refinement of Yomdin’s theory which allows us to also control the distortion. We will give two new applications: - for any C∞ surface diffeomorphism f with positive entropy the saddle periodic points with Lyapunov exponents $\delta$-away ...

37C05 ; 37C40 ; 37D25

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A dynamical system is called rigid if a weak form of equivalence with a nearby system, such as coincidence of some simple invariants, implies a strong form of equivalence. In this minicourse we will discuss smooth rigidity of hyperbolic dynamical systems and related geometric questions such as marked length spectrum rigidity of negatively curved manifolds. We will consider the following moduli: lengths of periodic orbits, spectra of Poincar\’e return maps of the periodic orbits, volume Lyapunov exponents. After a brief overview of some classical results we will focus on recent developments in rigidity of Anosov and partially hyperbolic systems as well as connections to geometric rigidity. The latter is based on joint work with B. Kalinin and V. Sadovskaya and with F. Rodriguez Hertz. A dynamical system is called rigid if a weak form of equivalence with a nearby system, such as coincidence of some simple invariants, implies a strong form of equivalence. In this minicourse we will discuss smooth rigidity of hyperbolic dynamical systems and related geometric questions such as marked length spectrum rigidity of negatively curved manifolds. We will consider the following moduli: lengths of periodic orbits, spectra of Poincar\’e ...

37D20

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A dynamical system is called rigid if a weak form of equivalence with a nearby system, such as coincidence of some simple invariants, implies a strong form of equivalence. In this minicourse we will discuss smooth rigidity of hyperbolic dynamical systems and related geometric questions such as marked length spectrum rigidity of negatively curved manifolds. We will consider the following moduli: lengths of periodic orbits, spectra of Poincar\’e return maps of the periodic orbits, volume Lyapunov exponents. After a brief overview of some classical results we will focus on recent developments in rigidity of Anosov and partially hyperbolic systems as well as connections to geometric rigidity. The latter is based on joint work with B. Kalinin and V. Sadovskaya and with F. Rodriguez Hertz. A dynamical system is called rigid if a weak form of equivalence with a nearby system, such as coincidence of some simple invariants, implies a strong form of equivalence. In this minicourse we will discuss smooth rigidity of hyperbolic dynamical systems and related geometric questions such as marked length spectrum rigidity of negatively curved manifolds. We will consider the following moduli: lengths of periodic orbits, spectra of Poincar\’e ...

37D20

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A dynamical system is called rigid if a weak form of equivalence with a nearby system, such as coincidence of some simple invariants, implies a strong form of equivalence. In this minicourse we will discuss smooth rigidity of hyperbolic dynamical systems and related geometric questions such as marked length spectrum rigidity of negatively curved manifolds. We will consider the following moduli: lengths of periodic orbits, spectra of Poincar\’e return maps of the periodic orbits, volume Lyapunov exponents. After a brief overview of some classical results we will focus on recent developments in rigidity of Anosov and partially hyperbolic systems as well as connections to geometric rigidity. The latter is based on joint work with B. Kalinin and V. Sadovskaya and with F. Rodriguez Hertz. A dynamical system is called rigid if a weak form of equivalence with a nearby system, such as coincidence of some simple invariants, implies a strong form of equivalence. In this minicourse we will discuss smooth rigidity of hyperbolic dynamical systems and related geometric questions such as marked length spectrum rigidity of negatively curved manifolds. We will consider the following moduli: lengths of periodic orbits, spectra of Poincar\’e ...

37D20

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We will show the proof that for generic Lipschitz functions on an expanding map there is a unique maximizing measure, and it is supported on a periodic orbit.

37D35

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We will show the proof that for generic Lipschitz functions on an expanding map there is a unique maximizing measure, and it is supported on a periodic orbit.

37D35

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We will show the proof that for generic Lipschitz functions on an expanding map there is a unique maximizing measure, and it is supported on a periodic orbit.

37D35

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Part I - Theory : In the "theory" part of this mini-course, we will present recent objects and phenomena related to the study of big mapping class groups. In particular, we will define two faithful actions of some big mapping class groups. The first is an action by isometries on a Gromov-hyperbolic graph. The second is an action by homeomorphisms on a circle in which the vertices of the graph naturally embed. We will describe some properties of the objects involved, and give some fruitful relations between the dynamics of the two actions. For example, we will see that loxodromic elements (for the first action) necessarily have rational rotation number (for the second action). Using these relations, we will explain how to construct non trivial quasimorphisms on subgroups of big mapping class groups. This includes joint work with Alden Walker.
Part II - Examples : In this part we will discuss a number of natural examples in which big mapping class groups and their subgroups arise. These include the inverse limit constructions of de Carvalho-Hall, the theory of finite depth (taut) foliations of 3-manifolds, the theory of “Artinization” of Thompson-like groups, two dimensional smooth dynamics, one dimensional complex dynamics (topology of the shift locus, Schottky spaces) and several other contexts. We will try to indicate how viewing these examples from the perspective of (big) mapping class groups is a worthwhile approach.
Part I - Theory : In the "theory" part of this mini-course, we will present recent objects and phenomena related to the study of big mapping class groups. In particular, we will define two faithful actions of some big mapping class groups. The first is an action by isometries on a Gromov-hyperbolic graph. The second is an action by homeomorphisms on a circle in which the vertices of the graph naturally embed. We will describe some properties of ...

37FXX ; 57Mxx

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Part I - Theory : In the "theory" part of this mini-course, we will present recent objects and phenomena related to the study of big mapping class groups. In particular, we will define two faithful actions of some big mapping class groups. The first is an action by isometries on a Gromov-hyperbolic graph. The second is an action by homeomorphisms on a circle in which the vertices of the graph naturally embed. We will describe some properties of the objects involved, and give some fruitful relations between the dynamics of the two actions. For example, we will see that loxodromic elements (for the first action) necessarily have rational rotation number (for the second action). Using these relations, we will explain how to construct non trivial quasimorphisms on subgroups of big mapping class groups. This includes joint work with Alden Walker.
Part II - Examples : In this part we will discuss a number of natural examples in which big mapping class groups and their subgroups arise. These include the inverse limit constructions of de Carvalho-Hall, the theory of finite depth (taut) foliations of 3-manifolds, the theory of “Artinization” of Thompson-like groups, two dimensional smooth dynamics, one dimensional complex dynamics (topology of the shift locus, Schottky spaces) and several other contexts. We will try to indicate how viewing these examples from the perspective of (big) mapping class groups is a worthwhile approach.
Part I - Theory : In the "theory" part of this mini-course, we will present recent objects and phenomena related to the study of big mapping class groups. In particular, we will define two faithful actions of some big mapping class groups. The first is an action by isometries on a Gromov-hyperbolic graph. The second is an action by homeomorphisms on a circle in which the vertices of the graph naturally embed. We will describe some properties of ...

37FXX ; 57Mxx

... Lire [+]

Déposez votre fichier ici pour le déplacer vers cet enregistrement.

Part I - Theory : In the "theory" part of this mini-course, we will present recent objects and phenomena related to the study of big mapping class groups. In particular, we will define two faithful actions of some big mapping class groups. The first is an action by isometries on a Gromov-hyperbolic graph. The second is an action by homeomorphisms on a circle in which the vertices of the graph naturally embed. We will describe some properties of the objects involved, and give some fruitful relations between the dynamics of the two actions. For example, we will see that loxodromic elements (for the first action) necessarily have rational rotation number (for the second action). Using these relations, we will explain how to construct non trivial quasimorphisms on subgroups of big mapping class groups. This includes joint work with Alden Walker.
Part II - Examples : In this part we will discuss a number of natural examples in which big mapping class groups and their subgroups arise. These include the inverse limit constructions of de Carvalho-Hall, the theory of finite depth (taut) foliations of 3-manifolds, the theory of “Artinization” of Thompson-like groups, two dimensional smooth dynamics, one dimensional complex dynamics (topology of the shift locus, Schottky spaces) and several other contexts. We will try to indicate how viewing these examples from the perspective of (big) mapping class groups is a worthwhile approach.
Part I - Theory : In the "theory" part of this mini-course, we will present recent objects and phenomena related to the study of big mapping class groups. In particular, we will define two faithful actions of some big mapping class groups. The first is an action by isometries on a Gromov-hyperbolic graph. The second is an action by homeomorphisms on a circle in which the vertices of the graph naturally embed. We will describe some properties of ...

37FXX ; 57Mxx

... Lire [+]

Déposez votre fichier ici pour le déplacer vers cet enregistrement.

Part I - Theory : In the "theory" part of this mini-course, we will present recent objects and phenomena related to the study of big mapping class groups. In particular, we will define two faithful actions of some big mapping class groups. The first is an action by isometries on a Gromov-hyperbolic graph. The second is an action by homeomorphisms on a circle in which the vertices of the graph naturally embed. We will describe some properties of the objects involved, and give some fruitful relations between the dynamics of the two actions. For example, we will see that loxodromic elements (for the first action) necessarily have rational rotation number (for the second action). Using these relations, we will explain how to construct non trivial quasimorphisms on subgroups of big mapping class groups. This includes joint work with Alden Walker.
Part II - Examples : In this part we will discuss a number of natural examples in which big mapping class groups and their subgroups arise. These include the inverse limit constructions of de Carvalho-Hall, the theory of finite depth (taut) foliations of 3-manifolds, the theory of “Artinization” of Thompson-like groups, two dimensional smooth dynamics, one dimensional complex dynamics (topology of the shift locus, Schottky spaces) and several other contexts. We will try to indicate how viewing these examples from the perspective of (big) mapping class groups is a worthwhile approach.
Part I - Theory : In the "theory" part of this mini-course, we will present recent objects and phenomena related to the study of big mapping class groups. In particular, we will define two faithful actions of some big mapping class groups. The first is an action by isometries on a Gromov-hyperbolic graph. The second is an action by homeomorphisms on a circle in which the vertices of the graph naturally embed. We will describe some properties of ...

37FXX ; 57Mxx

... Lire [+]

Déposez votre fichier ici pour le déplacer vers cet enregistrement.

Part I - Theory : In the "theory" part of this mini-course, we will present recent objects and phenomena related to the study of big mapping class groups. In particular, we will define two faithful actions of some big mapping class groups. The first is an action by isometries on a Gromov-hyperbolic graph. The second is an action by homeomorphisms on a circle in which the vertices of the graph naturally embed. We will describe some properties of the objects involved, and give some fruitful relations between the dynamics of the two actions. For example, we will see that loxodromic elements (for the first action) necessarily have rational rotation number (for the second action). Using these relations, we will explain how to construct non trivial quasimorphisms on subgroups of big mapping class groups. This includes joint work with Alden Walker.
Part II - Examples : In this part we will discuss a number of natural examples in which big mapping class groups and their subgroups arise. These include the inverse limit constructions of de Carvalho-Hall, the theory of finite depth (taut) foliations of 3-manifolds, the theory of “Artinization” of Thompson-like groups, two dimensional smooth dynamics, one dimensional complex dynamics (topology of the shift locus, Schottky spaces) and several other contexts. We will try to indicate how viewing these examples from the perspective of (big) mapping class groups is a worthwhile approach.
Part I - Theory : In the "theory" part of this mini-course, we will present recent objects and phenomena related to the study of big mapping class groups. In particular, we will define two faithful actions of some big mapping class groups. The first is an action by isometries on a Gromov-hyperbolic graph. The second is an action by homeomorphisms on a circle in which the vertices of the graph naturally embed. We will describe some properties of ...

37FXX ; 57Mxx

... Lire [+]

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