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Documents  Luczak, Malwina | enregistrements trouvés : 2

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Research talks;Probability and Statistics

We consider a simple stochastic model for the spread of a disease caused by two virus strains in a closed homogeneously mixing population of size N. In our model, the spread of each strain is described by the stochastic logistic SIS epidemic process in the absence of the other strain, and we assume that there is perfect cross-immunity between the two virus strains, that is, individuals infected by one strain are temporarily immune to re-infections and infections by the other strain. For the case where one strain has a strictly larger basic reproductive ratio than the other, and the stronger strain on its own is supercritical (that is, its basic reproductive ratio is larger than 1), we derive precise asymptotic results for the distribution of the time when the weaker strain disappears from the population, that is, its extinction time. We further consider what happens when the difference between the two reproductive ratios may tend to 0.
This is joint work with Fabio Lopes.
We consider a simple stochastic model for the spread of a disease caused by two virus strains in a closed homogeneously mixing population of size N. In our model, the spread of each strain is described by the stochastic logistic SIS epidemic process in the absence of the other strain, and we assume that there is perfect cross-immunity between the two virus strains, that is, individuals infected by one strain are temporarily immune to re...

60J27 ; 92D30

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Research talks;Probability and Statistics

In an epidemic model, the basic reproduction number $ R_{0}$ is a function of the parameters (such as infection rate) measuring disease infectivity. In a large population, if $ R_{0}> 1$, then the disease can spread and infect much of the population (supercritical epidemic); if $ R_{0}< 1$, then the disease will die out quickly (subcritical epidemic), with only few individuals infected.
For many epidemics, the dynamics are such that $ R_{0}$ can cross the threshold from supercritical to subcritical (for instance, due to control measures such as vaccination) or from subcritical to supercritical (for instance, due to a virus mutation making it easier for it to infect hosts). Therefore, near-criticality can be thought of as a paradigm for disease emergence and eradication, and understanding near-critical phenomena is a key epidemiological challenge.
In this talk, we explore near-criticality in the context of some simple models of SIS (susceptible-infective-susceptible) epidemics in large homogeneous populations.
In an epidemic model, the basic reproduction number $ R_{0}$ is a function of the parameters (such as infection rate) measuring disease infectivity. In a large population, if $ R_{0}> 1$, then the disease can spread and infect much of the population (supercritical epidemic); if $ R_{0}< 1$, then the disease will die out quickly (subcritical epidemic), with only few individuals infected.
For many epidemics, the dynamics are such that $ R_{0}$ can ...

92D30 ; 05C80 ; 92D25 ; 60J28

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